Thursday February 3: Ireland Institute debate – ‘Ireland in Crisis: Challenging the Consensus’


Via Cedar Lounge – @The Ireland Institute:

Anthony Coughlan and Sinéad Kennedy to debate the Irish economic, social, and political crisis

Important debate on ‘Ireland in Crisis: Challenging the Consensus’

Thursday, 3 February, 8.00pm, at the Pearse Centre, 27 Pearse Street, Dublin 2 (The Ireland Institute)

With an election in a few weeks time that is of great importance for the future direction of Irish society, it is essential that the nature of the crisis facing economic, social, and political life here is properly explored and analysed. A new government will be elected and will have to bring forward policies to address these problems and move Ireland towards recovery. The Ireland Institute argues that none of the parties contesting this election have a real understanding of the crisis: as a result, the solutions they propose can at best provide temporary relief and will inevitably lead to similar crises in the future. The answer will not be found in trying to revive and clean up the present system and hoping it will work better in future.

Anthony Coughlan and Sinéad Kennedy will address these issues at the Ireland Institute on Thursday evening, when they will debate the economic, social, and political crisis in Ireland. Anthony Coughlan will speak about how Ireland’s membership of the EU and adoption of the euro have affected Ireland’s experience of the crisis. Sinéad Kennedy will place the crisis in the context of capitalism as a global economic system.

Anthony Coughlan is Director of the National Platform EU Research and Information Centre, Dublin; President of the Foundation for EU Democracy, Brussels; and Senior Lecturer Emeritus in Social Policy at Trinity College Dublin; Sinéad Kennedy lectures in the English Department, NUI Maynooth. Kevin McCorry, People’s Movement, will chair the meeting.

The Ireland Institute believes that the debate to date has been dominated by a narrow consensus that does not question the structures within which the crisis is being played out. This consensus regards capitalism as the right and natural way to organise the economy and society: no alternative is admitted. In this worldview, competition, individualism, small government, privatisation, free trade and free movement of capital are self-evidently good and the means to economic success.

The Ireland Institute argues that the way capitalism organises the economy and society is at the root of the crisis. If we want real change, it will not be found in the solutions that are currently being proposed: more regulation of business and finance; reduction in the number of TDs; abolition of the Seanad; and updating of the 1937 Constitution.

Instead, the Institute considers that full democratisation of politics and the economy is the only way to change society so that, in the future, the common good of all citizens will be at the heart of policy. This means that all citizens must have a real share in decision making in Ireland, not just a vote every few years for one or other political elite.

This lecture series will challenge the consensus about the crisis.

The meeting will begin at 8.00pm, Thursday, February 3, at the Pearse Centre, 27 Pearse Street, Dublin 2.

This is the third meeting in the series.

Further information from Finbar Cullen, Director, 01-6704606
www.theirelandinstitute.com

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This entry was posted in Accountability, Action Stations, Bankers' Bailout, Budget, Debt Default/Restructuring, ECB/IMF, Economy, Elections, EU, Euro / Sovereign Money, Geopolitics, History, Ideology, ireland, Solutions and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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